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VOLUNTEER TEACHING & EDUCATION PROJECT IN PERU

 

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INTRODUCTION PERU TEACHING AND EDUCATION

An influx of internally displaced people, often due to extreme poverty, to the capital of Lima created temporary communities that are still in existence today. Education, a right of every child, is lacking in these communities due to a lack of government support, absence of a proper ID to enroll in formal schools, and a sense of despair that the current educational opportunities available to children will create pathways to a better future. Support the community through improving the day to day education for children through activities, instruction, and individual support at day care centers and pre-schools so that children and families get a positive start to meet their educational goals.

Education unlocks opportunities, but with an estimated 50% of the adolescent population of Peru at work when school is in session, advancement and achievement by way of secondary school becomes an enormous challenge. Work with The KIVOLEX Education & Literacy Project and assist underfunded primary and secondary schools by sharing your love of learning with students, teachers, and community members alike. Your individualized classroom support and English language lessons will provide opportunities for future employment and bolster struggling attendance rates. The gift of your time and knowledge could give a child a much greater gift – the means to a brighter future.

TEACHING AND EDUCATION VOLUNTEERING IN PERU

Over the past few decades, every President in Peru has proclaimed education as a priority;
yet, in spite of recent progress across several indicators, educational outcomes are still on
average low, and gaps between students large and closely linked with their individual and
family background. This paper looks at the education trajectories of children in different
stages of life, using data from Young Lives, an international study that follows two groups of
children: an Older Cohort (born in 1994) and a Younger Cohort (born in 2001). According to
the Peruvian Constitution and General Education Law, education is considered a human
right, and all students should have access to a quality service. However, results from our
study and others suggest that while there have been important advances over the past two
decades, there is still a long way to go for this to become a reality for everyone.
Peruvian early childhood education consists of two types of preschool: Jardines, which are
located in urban areas, and PRONOEI, which are usually in rural or impoverished areas.
While attendance in preschool education has increased recently, our results show that by the
age of 5 there are already differences in abilities that are related to family background.
Furthermore, even after adjusting for these, children from Jardines have higher results in
primary school than children from PRONOEI.
Peruvian children are expected to attend primary school during middle childhood (ages 6 to
12), and most do. When we compare overage instances between the Older and Younger
Cohort, it has been reduced, which is positive as more children are in their normative grade.
Achievement in national and international assessments, as well as our own data, also show
increases on average scores along with large gaps by wealth, area of residence, maternal
education, and ethnicity. Regarding the latter, while Peruvian law states that children have
the right to learn in their mother language, our results show that almost 39 per cent of
indigenous children learn in Spanish only. In general, we find that educational opportunities
are not fairly distributed. For example, urban schools (public and private) congregate richer,
Spanish-speaking students and have better resources and more pedagogically able
teachers; these students in turn have higher test results

 

 

VOICE FROM PERU COMMUNITY

“With the kids, it’s really refreshing and eye opening to see how positive they are given their circumstances.”

“KIVOLEX volunteers have helped to improve our students’ social skills. Mothers of our students have also benefited from the cultural exchange with the volunteers.”

“Help from foreign volunteers gives our students and their families more hope for their future. For staff, it has been an enriching experience and a chance to meet people from different cultures.”

 

CULTURAL ACTIVITIES IN PERU

volunteer cultural activities abroad

 

LIMA STREET ART & GRAFFITI

Explore the streets of Callao, Lima’s fishing port just north of the city, where art expositions, films, and photo shoots all converge into one colorful explosion in this hip and up-and-coming district. Learn about the history and meaning of the street art that meets you at every turn, and leave your mark on Lima through a graffiti tour and class.

TAKE SPANISH LESSONS

Our Spanish lessons will help you communicate with ease during your volunteer experience, and out in the community while you’re exploring. Courses are held twice a week at the KIVOLEX Home-Base, and are tailored for beginner, intermediate, and advanced speakers. Whether you want the know-how to find “el baño” at a restaurant, or are hoping to put your Peruvian slang to the test, your KIVOLEX language instructor will help you get there.

TOUR PLAZA DE ARMAS & CATACOMBS

Join us downtown, the colonial district of Lima where vestiges of Spain’s colonial empire still linger. Make your way through the palm tree lined Plaza de Armas to catacombs of the Convento de San Francisco to see the catacombs, which served as a burial place until 1808.

MIRAFLORES ARTISAN MARKET

At the traditional Inca market in Miraflores, you can purchase alpaca socks (or alpaca anything, really), along with artisan goods from all over the country. Have fun practicing your Spanish skills while bargaining for a better price (don’t be shy; it’s expected!)

VISIT THE “EARTH MAKER” AT PACHACAMAC

Named for the pre-Incan god Pacha Kamaq, or “Earth Maker”, the ruins of Pachacamac will transport you back in time to the Temple of the Sun and Temple of the Moon to learn about the religious beliefs and cultural systems of one of Peru’s earliest civilizations.

MAKE PERUVIAN CHOCOLATE

While the origins of chocolate are still under debate, many experts agree that the cocoa bean originated from the Andes foothills in the Amazon rainforest. Create your own “food of the Gods” at a chocolate-making class in Peru, and get a taste of what is becoming known more and more as one of the best chocolates in the world.

TRY YOUR HAND AT PERUVIAN FONTS

Located in a small artist studio in the heart of Barranco, attend a workshop focused on teaching us about the famous Lima font that can be seen on the sides of taxis, buses, and trucks. This font dates back to the 1950’s and has become a contemporary aspect of street art in Lima. In this workshop, you will learn how to make this font, and will create a piece of art you can take home with you.

BOAT AROUND LAKE TITICACA

Visit South America’s largest lake and boat around to each of the man-made inhabited islands, made entirely of reeds. After a day on the lake, visit Puno, the folklore capital of Peru, to share a story and a cup of tea with some local residents.

SEE COLCA CANYON

Arequipa is Peru’s second largest city and also one of its most beautiful, with ethereal white stone buildings nestled in the foothills of Peru’s southern volcanic belt. Hit the markets to purchase some of the aromatic spices you’ve been tasting in local cuisine, and visit the Santa Catalina Monastery for a respite from the hustle and bustle of the city. Climb volcanoes, or if you’ve got time for a longer jaunt, hike the Colca Canyon, for some serious bragging rights.

VISIT CUSCO

Cusco is more than just the gateway to Machu Picchu and a convenient stop on the way to the Amazon; it’s also an incredible historical and archaeological treasure. Visit Choquequirao to explore the ruins of this small Incan City, then head back to town to check out Spanish cathedrals and chow down on some of the amazing cuy — guinea pig, a Peruvian delicacy. Take a photo or two of the “White Christ” statue watching over the city with arms outstretched.

EXPLORE MACHU PICCHU

Lace up your hiking boots and hike the four-day Inca Trail from Cusco to reach Machu Picchu’s sun gate just in time for a once-in-a-lifetime sunrise over the nearly 600 year-old Incan ruins. You can also choose the one-day hike or take the train, but be sure to allow yourself a couple of days to explore the entire complex. Wander through the ruins of the temples and see for yourself why Machu Picchu is one of the new wonders of the world.

LIVE LIKE A LOCAL

Peru’s largest city is the perfect place to practice your Spanish. Sing a duet with new friends at a karaoke bar downtown, or join in with the local kids as they splash around in the fountains of the Parque de la Reserva. Once you’ve toweled off, be sure to hang around for the nightly light and water show that starts after dark.

FREE TIME IN PERU

 

EXPLORE BOHEMIAN BARRANCO

Lima is brimming with trendy, fun neighborhoods, with a blend of ancient architecture, artsy cafes, and colorful streets. In the Bohemian neighborhood of Barranco, hold your breath across the Puente de los Suspiros bridge and discover dance troupes, street art, and a delicious taste of ceviche as you discover how Peru blends the best of old and new.

PARAGLIDE ON THE PACIFIC

See Lima from a bird’s eye view with a paragliding experience off the cliffs of Miraflores. As you sail over the Pacific Ocean, you’ll spot urban high rises, the foothills of Lima, and surfers enjoying the world-famous waves of Peru

SANDBOARD AT A DESERT OASIS

Discover Ica and the desert oasis community of Huacachina. On the sand dunes of one of the driest places on earth, try your hand at sandboarding. Or visit the Ballestas Islands to enjoy the penguins and sea lions that live freely in the Paracas National Reserve.

BOAT AROUND LAKE TITICACA

Visit South America’s largest lake and boat around to each of the man-made inhabited islands, made entirely of reeds. After a day on the lake, visit Puno, the folklore capital of Peru, to share a story and a cup of tea with some local residents.

SEE COLCA CANYON

Arequipa is Peru’s second largest city and also one of its most beautiful, with ethereal white stone buildings nestled in the foothills of Peru’s southern volcanic belt. Hit the markets to purchase some of the aromatic spices you’ve been tasting in local cuisine, and visit the Santa Catalina Monastery for a respite from the hustle and bustle of the city. Climb volcanoes, or if you’ve got time for a longer jaunt, hike the Colca Canyon, for some serious bragging rights.

 

HOME BASE ACCOMMODATION IN PERU

Your Home-Base in the Chorrillos district of Lima reflects Peruvian culture, with access to vibrant markets and cozy neighborhood eateries, all located within close proximity to the communities we serve in an authentic and welcoming community. The Home-Base, located on the second floor of a Peruvian family home, offers a rooftop terrace and a lovely patio garden so you can make yourself at home. Join fellow volunteers in a comfortable living area adorned with Peruvian decor before you retreat to shared bedrooms, separated by gender. The lifelong

friendships forged in the KIVOLEX Home-Base are just one incredible benefit of this unique environment.

Enjoy locally-prepared meals each day in the Home-Base reflecting Peru’s world-famous cuisine. You’ll love lunch served with fresh passion fruit juice, and volunteers can’t get enough of the incredible chili sauce that you’ll want to add to every meal. With a plethora of options for you to discover, we’re sure you’ll find your favorite Peruvian dish in no time.

WORDS FROM OUR REPRESENTATIVE IN PERU

I believe that positive impact and investment in education can change the realities of the beneficiaries we serve. I am passionate about ensuring that each volunteer makes a meaningful difference, but also experiences Lima from the perspective of a Peruvian, from the delicious food to our history and culture.

I hold a Bachelor’s Degree in Tourism Management from San Ignacio de Loyola University (Lima, Peru) and a Master’s Degree in International Cultural Heritage Management from Durham University (Durham, UK). My work experience ranges from tourism to cultural heritage to social responsibility, where I have a particular interest in creating experiences that represent a true Peruvian immersion.

I am passionate about impactful volunteering and sustainability. KIVOLEX gives me a chance to make a difference.

 

 

 

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